Space Vulture by Gary K. Wolf and Archbishop John J. Myers

The Book
The Story
The Characters
Two Boys
The Authors
The Origin
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Space Vulture - A New Science Fiction Novel by Gary K. Wolf and Archbishop John J. Myers

 

 

Space Vulture

I can’t think of another book that had me grinning throughout as much as SPACE VULTURE, a total throwback to old-school science fiction of the pulp days. The book is a collaboration between two longtime childhood friends whose careers took different paths: Gary K. Wolf, a writer whose creation of Roger Rabbit became a huge movie, and Archbishop John J. Myers, a high-ranking official in the Catholic Church.
In the opening pages, we learn that as kids, they devoured books together with a common love for sci-fi. They always had an idea to write a tribute to the space operas they grew up with – epic in scope and adventure – and this is it.

SPACE VULTURE is a novel that fathers and sons can enjoy together; there is nothing too scary or gory to frighten the youngsters. But it’s filled with plenty of good Buck Rogers-like exploits that sorely have been missing from most science fiction of today.

The story follows ultimate good guy Marshall Corsaire, who after capturing con man Gil Terry, comes face to face with the Space Vulture, a preening, over-the-top bad guy. After the Vulture lets Terry go free, he takes everyone prisoner – Corsaire included – in a settlement, with the idea of selling them off as slaves. Terry figures he has got it made until he finds out that two little brothers were left hiding by their mother, and the boys make it their goal to free their mom, with Terry becoming an unexpected guardian who slowly warms up to them.

Look, the plot is not what you would call deep or even taxing. But that’s not the point. It’s all about the high adventure with two storylines: the boys having adventure after adventure with their newfound “Uncle Gil,” while Corsaire deals with an escape plan to free the captives and capture the Space Vulture. It reads like this story could have been serialized back in the day, where kids would be left clamoring for the next chapter. It’s written with so much fun and enjoyment, you’ll wish this type of pastiche would be more prevalent; its fun ending could easily lead into a sequel.

Early on, there’s a two-word tribute of sorts to the late Douglas Adams that really made me smile. This story will please readers of all ages, but if you’re expecting some greater meaning, pick up something else. It’s all about the fantastical days of sci-fi when the promises of ray guns were all little boys wanted. Get SPACE VULTURE for the kid inside of you, then share it with an actual little one.

— Bruce Grossman, Bookgasm.com


The Book | The Story | The Characters | Two Boys | The Authors | The Origin | New Pulp Traditions
Articles | Reviews | The Sonic Room | Purchase | Contact Us

© 2007-2011 Gary K. Wolf and Archbishop John J. Myers. All rights reserved.